Tag Archives: Attack Cat Studio

Horizontal Cats

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We had our first snow fall of the season this weekend. Cats do not ask to go out in the Tabby Shack when it’s snowing. Instead, they  seek warmth in after-storm sun puddles.

Tabby cat on carpet

Don’t let this cute picture fool you, I was seconds away from being bopped.

Just to mix it up a bit, a cat may take over my work stool in the studio where I’m creating new book cloth in preparation for the next holiday show.

Cat on black chair

Lucy deposits cat hair on my chair, while simultaneously waiting for me to give her head scruffs.

I’m excited about the new work, even if Lucy is not impressed.

Hand printed cloth

No cats appear on the new printed cloth.  It turns out that not everybody loves cats! Who knew?

Art Visits Katz

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When you get a chance, prowl on by the awesome and comprehensive Katzenworld site to see my occasional guest entry, the Friday Art Cat, where you’ll find some arty cats drawn or painted by me!

Black cat and tuxedo cat

This is a fan painting I made of Nubia and Oliver, just two of the felines you’ll find in the World of Cats that is Katzenworld.

Your Itinerant Attack Cat

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Handmade Books

Just a sampling of my handmade sketchbooks and journals.

Directly after Drawlloween, I turned all of my attention to production for the Holiday Art Market where I sold my handmade paper goods. Namely, journals and sketchbooks that I bind by hand, with covers of original design. In preparation for the show, I completed 90 books and orbs in just fourteen days! I’ve been blogging about my progress and describe one bookmaking process here, give an update here,  and then discuss my paper orbs in a later post.

Art fair booth set up

Attack Cat Studio at the Holiday Art Market.

I had a successful showing this weekend and visitors to the market seemed to really like my work. Since this was the first full-on beta test for Attack Cat Studio, I feel pretty good about the results. It was especially interesting to watch people interact with the displays. For example, some of the book stands are a little tippy. But, the flow of traffic through my booth seemed to work well. I also collected a few contacts who are interested in taking a bookmaking class with me in the winter.

Attack Cat Studio Logo

In addition to connecting people with sketchbooks and journals, I get to talk with cat lovers who notice my logo. The most frequently asked question is, “Which one is the attack cat?!”

Now, I prepare for another show, this one in December, at the Merry Maker’s Marketplace. I have new images to print for book covers, larger sketchbooks to create, and lots of pocket-sized journals to replace. If you’re interested in seeing some more of my work, you can check meow-t on Etsy.

Cat in a Box

Miss Bean, the original Attack Cat.

Learning By The Book

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Learning By The Book

It’s been an interesting transition for me from teaching in a school setting where there are requirements, grades, and some continuity from one class period to the next, to workshop teaching where the time is limited to a few hours, and the class is more about acquiring an experience based on a single skill. Believe me, this is a BIG adjustment for me. I’m used to having multiple class periods to introduce, reinforce, and direct an in-depth project or skill set. Instead of thinking long-term, I have to focus more on teaching something that can be accomplished in a short period of time, yet still be a challenging, rewarding experience for the participants.

Beautiful books made by adult students in my bookmaking class.

Beautiful books made by students in my bookmaking class taught at Blackbird Studios.

I recently guided students in a bookmaking class, keeping in mind the shift to one-time experience-style instruction. The participants were determined, yet nervous, in their intention to make a book, so I went step by step through the process, which included:

  • selecting and folding all of the papers,
  • preparing the edges for sewing by poking carefully measured perforations on each fold,
  • binding the pages together by sewing over the tapes, into each page,  and linking the ends,
  • and, finally, gluing the covers together.

The class was scheduled to meet for two hours, but ran over by about thirty minutes, as I underestimated how long it would take the group to finish. (Every time I teach, I learn something new about my process and how I might do things differently.) Despite the extra time, I think all the participants were amazed with their creations and left proud of their new books!

Handmade Monday Block Out

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I am assembling small printing blocks because I enjoy…

  • Multiples: Being able to reproduce the same, or similar image repeatedly and in variation so that there is more than one.
  • Repetition: I am naturally attracted to patterns. There is beauty in organization, design, and structure. Can be organic or geometric.
  • Layered imagery. Inspired by the effects fabric artists get with cloth and my long-time experience in using watercolor. I want to create depth through layering of color and image.

    Rubber stamp print

    Simple rubber stamp made with Speedy Cut. I used this to give a faux linoleum print feel.

I used Speedy Cut for the large square block, and sticky-backed flexi cut, which is a thin, easy-to-cut rubber material, mounted to a square of thick binder’s board for the shape blocks.

Handmade cat stamp

Relief blocks made out of sheets of flexi-cut mounted on heavy binder’s board.

Blocks were then printed onto a piece of handmade 100% cotton rag paper that I previous painted with watercolor and left to dry covered in bubble wrap. The resulting image leaves the circle pattern of the bubble wrap in the dry paint.

Block print pattern. Person holding block print pattern.

Top: Different trials with stamps.
Bottom: Me with the final result.

This paper will get used as a cover for a handmade book, so stay tuned! More about that, later.

In a Row on Caturday

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I mean a row where things are lined up in a queue, as opposed to the kind of row one does to propel a boat, or a row that means a quarrel or dispute. I doubled-rowed here, where I illustrate a sequence of events in a row, as well as present the image of Miss Bean who appears in rows on a mesh screen which was used to print on fabric that became the cover of a book. I call this one “Green Bean.”

Cat with black and white camera-ready art of same.

Miss Bean, a fetching muse, posing prior to her visage being translated for the artwork.

Thermofax screen with cats.

Mesh screen used to print Miss Bean image onto fabric.

Cat fabric and handmade book.

Raw screen printed fabric on the left. The final book after the cloth was dyed on the right.