Category Archives: Screenprinting

Horizontal Cats

Standard

We had our first snow fall of the season this weekend. Cats do not ask to go out in the Tabby Shack when it’s snowing. Instead, they  seek warmth in after-storm sun puddles.

Tabby cat on carpet

Don’t let this cute picture fool you, I was seconds away from being bopped.

Just to mix it up a bit, a cat may take over my work stool in the studio where I’m creating new book cloth in preparation for the next holiday show.

Cat on black chair

Lucy deposits cat hair on my chair, while simultaneously waiting for me to give her head scruffs.

I’m excited about the new work, even if Lucy is not impressed.

Hand printed cloth

No cats appear on the new printed cloth.  It turns out that not everybody loves cats! Who knew?

An Obvious Mixed Bag

Standard
An Obvious Mixed Bag

I hope you’ll forgive me. I have a case of blog posting procrastination. Not only have I been remodeling the basement, a.k.a. The Mole Level, the weather has been pristine. Clear blue skies, crisp in the morning, yet warm enough in the afternoon for me to be lured away from responsibilities.

Scaredy Cats

Lucy, Vera, and Bean in various stages of denial about the strangers in our house. P.S. I would not usually publish such a poor photo of Vera (center) but her hiding place deep in the closet left me no choice but to use a flash.

The cats have been in hiding during while the workmen are here, so it’s hard to get good cat portraits. And for some reason, I’ve been avoiding my camera, unaware that I should be documenting all of the changes. I must be having an identity crisis. Or, maybe I feel the shift from the mostly carefree days of summer to the seriousness brought on by the ever-so-slight hint of color on the maples.

Left: A workman replaces the carpet in the stairwell as seen through the cat door. Right: Walls prepped for painting in the family room.

Left: A workman replaces the carpet in the stairwell as seen through the cat door. Right: Walls prepped for painting in the family room.

Whatever it is, the cats are constant in their cat-ness, anchoring me to the earth, lest I float away with the first falling leaf. I have, despite the distractions, managed to make some new books in anticipation of a busy (and not-far-away) holiday season.

Handmade books

Handmade books. Larger, printed books are sewn on tapes. Smaller books are suede with tie closure.

Today, the waves on Lake Michigan are supposed to be seven feet high. Maybe I’ll take a drive out to see them…. Ah, but that’s the wistful, wish-it-was-summer me. More likely that I will get back to my blogging and book arts, do some housework, and make a quick run up the road to the vegetable stand for some fresh tomatoes to go with dinner.

Heirloom Tomatoes

It’s easy to find a good tomato this time of year.

Building A Book

Standard
Building A Book

You may (or may not) have noticed the intermittent, yet ongoing, production from my studio. There was the fabric dyeing day, followed by multiple screen printing sessions using my old thermofax machine to burn screens. Now, I’m finally turning the printed and dyed fabric into blank journals and sketchbooks.

Steps showing sewing on tapes.

Top: The finished cover before the pages are attached. Bottom Left and Right: Shows what the in-process sewing looks like from the inside and the outside of the book.

The books have soft covers that I create by attaching the fabrics to Pellon Fuse-n-Shape, a thick, iron on interfacing that gives the covers some thickness without making them too thick. The binding is a variation of the coptic stitch and sewing over tapes. I like this binding because it leaves the spine exposed, and allows the visible stitches to become part of the aesthetics of the finished book. This binding is also sturdy and allows the book to lie completely flat when opened, a desirable quality when writing or drawing.

Orange Cat Book

Hand-dyed fabric with thermofax screen image, exposed-spine sewing on decorative cotton strips. Book is bound with waxed linen.

I have fun coordinating the cords, threads, and fabrics to individualize every book– no two are identical. Sometimes, I choose contrasting fabrics for the front and back of the book to add visual interest. So far, I have constructed six of these soft cover books and, with each one I complete, I learn a little more about the small things I’d like to finesse.

Cat on table with books

A selection of books, guarded over by the original Attack Cat, Miss Bean.

My Thermofax Machine is SO Mid-century

Standard

Thermofax technology was developed by 3M in the 1950’s as a way to make a copy of a document using heat and carbon. Artists use them today to make stencils for screen printing and tattoo art. This works by inserting a filmy plastic sheet and a toner photocopy together into a feeder slot which grabs the materials and passes them through a heated area causing the toner to “burn” the image into the plastic sheet.  I bought my thermofax for around $300 in 2001, back when eBay was still an auction-only site. Due to their popularity with artists, and the difficulty in locating one, a reconditioned thermofax machine like mine can sell for around $1,000, or more!

Vintage Copy Machine

Classic advertising showing the original use for the Thermofax circa 1960’s. You can see more vintage ads at Adsausage.

Picture of thermofax machine

Top: A beauty shot of my Secretary thermofax. Bottom: Photocopy and resulting screen used for printing.

Making screens and transferring an image is magical. You can easily reproduce the exact image onto almost anything from the same screen. Though, screens do wear down or occasionally tear, they are easy to replace, and you can get awesome results. Once the image is burned into the screen, ink is forced through the stencil leaving the image transferred onto your surface.

Hands screen printing with helicopter image

Left: My friend carefully crafting the multi-colored helicopter t-shirt for his son. Right: Finished helicopters in a row.

Recently, some friends came over for a combination dinner and print-your-own shirt party. (The delicious meal was prepared by my friend, Wendy, who blogs at In Other People’s Kitchens.)  One friend has a toddler who is obsessed with helicopters, so he dedicated his printing time to meticulously making a multi-colored image. Our physics teacher friend and my math teacher husband like nerdy math references, hence the speed of light sign. The rest of us preferred decorative birds, and, of course, the Attack Cat Studio cats, Bean, Vera, and Lucy.

Birds, cats, and speed limit sign

Results from the super-fun dinner party and screen printing night.