Sad, but not hopeless

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On Sunday nights I used to help feed feral cats who lived in managed colonies not far from my neighborhood. There were four stops, and on any given night, I might see from 5 – 30 cats who came to the feeding areas for food. There were a few cats who would get close enough for a quick scruff, but the majority of them would hang back until the food was in a dish.

Ink drawing of feral cat waiting for food.

My Inktober interpretation for SAD is based on my experiences with the colony cats. I would worry on nights when I didn’t see a regular visitor, or if a cat was clearly in distress. But, at the very least, these cats were spayed or neutered, and got a meal once a day. Occasionally, there would be a sick or injured cat, who, if it could be safely trapped, received health care. When kittens did show up, they were carefully captured, and placed in forever homes.

I dedicate this drawing to all of those scrappy cats who survive in the streets, around dumpsters, drainages, and parking lots.

 

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14 responses »

  1. Pingback: Sad, but not hopeless – Rattiesforeverworldpresscom

  2. Really sad, but not hopeless, as you said. So you have not very cold winters that these cats survive there. Here is people who take a kitten in spring for a summer and abandon it in the autumn to an empty summer cottage. At this time of a year all shelters are full of hundreds of cats. But nobody knows how many cats die during the winter. Every winter we have very cold times, even -30° C . Every year here is campaigning against taking a summer cat, but people are so stupid and don’t care, it is just a cat, they say. So bad!

    • Summer cats! What a tragedy for those cats who come to depend on the people during the kinder weather. I’m sorry to hear your story. It’s true that, where I was feeding the cats, in South Texas, the winters did not affect the feral population. Where I live now, though, in Northern Michigan, the weather certainly takes its toll. Thank you for sharing about those people who think, “it’s just a cat.” We know differently. ❤

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